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December 11, 2011

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Alyssa

Yay! Thanks Mike :D

simonc

cant u do a happy episode next mike? T.T m

jean

poor poor Stilicho

Richard

I wonder how much did the Gauls and Spanish consider themselves as "Roman" , surely they could organize some kind of force to repulse the attack? Is it just the empire was losing its ability to protect the citizens so that the citizens became indifferent?

David McLain

162 episodes in and I still have no idea what you look like. Therefore, I'm assuming that you're a big fat guy with a mohawk and a mountain man beard. Seems right.

Carrie

I'm so glad Rome won't fall until after the holidays.

Manus

I sincerely hope you re-consider your intention, declared at the very beginning, of finishing with the disappearance from record of Romulus Augustus.
Your next one is going to be on the Eastern Empire, so once poor Romulus disappears, continuing with the history of the Eastern Empire until at least the death of Justinian, the last Latin emperor, would be fantastic.
On the other hand, all good things must come to an end, but does that end have to be so nigh?

Thanks for all the hours of info!

dave

Mike you have given me enormous insight into history and this examination of the empire is just amazing. I have no idea how you did it but thank you. I hope you continue with the Eastern Empire...I REALLY do as I hate to have it end with the short just half done but whatever happens thank you.

Jared, Legio II Duncania

@David, there's a picture of Mike at http://www.historyofrometour.com/

Julius

i really love this podcast... it is really interesting to see the roots of the subsequent eras taking hold. i hope you consider tracing the historical memory of rome that has affected subsequent numerous claims to the roman emperor throne all the way through 1800's along with the byzantine throne. Subjects like Charlemagne and even Napolean, etc. Or topics like how roman literature affected the dark/middle ages and court life Anyway, that'd be sick!! I can't get enough of roman stuff.

LB

Mike,

The end is fast approaching. I would like to request that you let us down easy by tying the podcast up, when the time comes, with at least a few special interest episodes (e.g. gambling games, chariot racing, and gladiatorial combat; cults and priesthoods in ancient Rome; Roman food throughout the empire; You just rambling on about topics that you feel didn't get covered enough, etc.) and maybe a final question blowout.

You are an amazingly gifted storyteller, and you have created a valuable resource for both casual and serious students of history. Thank you so much.

Luise (Tasmania,Australia)

Well said and 'Seconded' LB! I'm a history muggle and have learnt so much. I will be listening to this podcast over and over...until my ipod dies!

Nick Dunlavey

Just listened to this, and am absurdly cheery for hearing my name on the Audible recommendation :)

James Messenger

Another great episode Mike. Thanks a lot.

Howard Wiseman

Hi Mike,
Thanks for the wonderfal podcasts. I'm deliberately staying a few podcasts behind the times in case you are forced to take a break or something, so only just listening to these ones. I have a question: you say Constantine III (as he later became) defeated some Saxons in northern Gaul before moving on to secure Gaul. This is getting towards my area of expertise ("Arthurian Britain") but this was a detail about Constantine III I had not heard of. Can you give me a reference? (preferably a primary source). Cheers, Howard.

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